Talpiot Tomb Fatigue Syndrome

Although many of my colleagues are suffering from a malady called TTFS  (Talpiot tomb fatigue syndrome), and likely view further posts on the subject (especially from me!) akin to “beating a dead horse,” I trust their condition will not be chronic. This is not to be confused with a related but more rare condition TFS (Tabor Fatigue Syndrome) that is easily handled with proper consultation. Nonetheless, I continue to find the vast majority of folk, academics included, are “underinformed” on the subject. I think if I hear the dismissive mantra “The names in the Talpiot tomb are extremely common” again I will be down to my last nerve.

TTFS Image

I have been inundated with calls, emails, Facebook messages, and queries in the comments on my FB pages about all sorts of Talpiot related questions since the story in the New York Times, “Findings Reignite Debate on Claim of Jesus’ Bones,” was published so prominently last week. How many Talpiot tombs are there? Were there bones in the ossuaries? Were DNA tests done and what were the results? Wasn’t the James ossuary inscription shown to be a forgery? Were not these names found in this tomb extremely common? Is there any evidence Jesus was married? How could there be a tomb of Jesus known to his followers and they still report he was resurrected?–and on and on it goes. I realize some are coming to this Jesus tomb story late and are not up on the basic facts. I can’t really tutor everyone who asks about the basics, not because I don’t want to–I am a teacher by trade–but for lack of time. In just about every case the answer to these basic questions are readily at hand. If you read and dig a bit you will learn all you want about the Talpiot tombs rather easily. Here are some places to start, based primarily on my own work on the topic, but also branching out to further resources written by others, most of which are online and readily available.

The book, The Jesus Discovery​, published in 2011 (co-authored with Simcha Jacobovici) is the most comprehensive treatment of everything dealing with all three Talpiot tombs with full documentation on all the issues of controversy. It includes full chapters on the excavation and explorations of Tomb A and B; the James ossuary, Mary Magdalene in history and tradition, bones and DNA tests, and the development of early Christian views of resurrection. It is all there. There is also a web site for Tomb B with photos and all sorts of other documentation on our 2010 robotic camera probe. Also, Jacobovici’s 2007 book, The Jesus Family Tomb, remains an indispensable introduction to the subject as a whole.

Then there is the rich volume edited by James Charlesworth, The Tomb of Jesus and His Family (Eerdmans 2013), a wonderful 584 page collection of s from the Jerusalem 2008 Princeton Symposium on Judaism and Christian Origins covering every aspect of the topic. There was plenty of controversy at the Symposium, with vocal reports in the press asserting all sorts of claims on one side or the other, read my full report on the Society of Biblical Literature web site, “The Meyers/Magness Talpiot Tomb Statement: Some Observations.”

In terms of web resources there is a lot. You might want to begin with my exchange with my friend Jodi Magness, one of the most vocal Talpiot tomb critics (“the Talpiot tomb is not – indeed, cannot – be the tomb of Jesus and his family“) on the Society of Biblical Literature web site, archived here and here. There is quite a bit more archived at the SBL site that you can retrieve by searching for “Talpiot.” The web site Bibleinterp.com has special topical sections on both the Talpiot Tombs and the James ossuary, see here and here. All sorts of papers and documents are archived there and can be downloaded or read online. They represent views both pro and con and cover just about every issue that has been discussed. I would recommend in particular the ASOR papers with exchanges between me, Mark Goodacre, and Chris Rollston, see: The Tombs at Talpiot: An Overview, plus my overview of the Jesus tomb published in Charlesworth’s volume that you can access on-line here: The Case for a Jesus Family Tomb: An Overview. Simcha Jacobovici also has numerous posts on his blog, Simchajtv.com, try searching for “Talpiot.”

There are many dozens–alright hundreds!–of posts on my blog but you might begin with these and follow the links, plus run searches for “Talpiot” or “James” if you are not sated after reading these and want more:

http://jamestabor.com/2007/04/09/the-talpiot-jesus-tomb-an-overview/

http://jamestabor.com/2014/04/02/the-talpiot-jesus-tomb-sorting-through-the-facts-and-the-fictions/

http://jamestabor.com/2015/04/09/how-the-belief-in-the-resurrection-of-jesus-originated-and-developed-a-newold-hypothesis/

http://jamestabor.com/2012/04/14/why-people-are-confused-about-the-earliest-christian-view-of-resurrection-of-the-dead/

http://jamestabor.com/2013/09/30/cold-case-christianity-and-the-resurrection-of-jesus-read-these-five-posts-and-you-will-never-view-things-the-same/

http://jamestabor.com/2012/12/19/a-readers-guide-to-the-unfolding-james-ossuary-story/

http://jamestabor.com/2015/03/26/whats-what-regarding-the-controversial-james-ossuary-part-1/

http://jamestabor.com/2015/04/04/breaking-news-the-controversial-james-ossuary-and-the-talpiot-tomb/

http://jamestabor.com/2015/04/07/ben-witherington-on-the-james-ossuary-and-the-talpiot-jesus-tomb/

http://jamestabor.com/2014/11/15/a-married-jesus-why-i-changed-my-mind-part-1/